SLC’s “Other” Community Garden

Written by Katherine Pioli

The black cherry tomatoes are climbing the trellis of branches, growing an archway over the white wooden gate. The corn stalks are turning the color of the red rock slabs nearby that fit together with jigsaw puzzle perfection forming a snaking bench down the line of the street. The Swiss chard, half harvested, adds color and shape between the raised rock patios and solidly balanced stone coffee table tops. Lovingly crafted, Timmi Cruz's urban garden and community gathering space on the parking strip around his home two block from the CATALYST office was just coming into perfection in June when a complaint was lodged with the city about activities on the parking strip.

Metaphors for the Month

Written by Suzanne Wagner
Published in Regulars & Shorts

It's a busy month. Are you ready for the Grand Fire Trine?
by Suzanne Wagner

Radio Theatre: A Feast for the Ear

Written by Matthew Ivan Bennett
Published in Regulars & Shorts

Radio Hour Episode 9: Grimm
by Matthew Ivan Bennett

Yoga Pose of the Month

Written by Charlotte Bell
Published in Regulars & Shorts

B.K.S. Iyengar: What is his legacy, and what will be yours?
by Charlotte Bell

Comings & Goings

Written by Katherine Pioli
Published in Regulars & Shorts

What's new around town.
by Katherine Pioli

Feature Calendar: Moab Folk Camp

Written by Charlotte Bell
Published in Regulars & Shorts

Southeastern Utah Music and Songwriting Workshops.
by Charlotte Bell

A New Kind of Survival School

Written by Katherine Pioli

A true survivalist needs only five things to live. She needs a cutting tool for splitting firewood or gutting fish; combustion to start a fire; cover, a simple plastic bag or emergency blanket, to keep warm and dry; a container for water, to remain hydrated; and cordage—rope can be an amazing tool. The survivalist C's, a list created by Dave Canterbury of the Pathfinder School, is deceptively simple, for, without the special knowledge and training required to effectively use these tools for survival in the wilderness, their presence is nearly worthless.

Putting the Garden to Bed

Written by Katherine Pioli

There are still signs in my garden that tell of the once prolific abundance of food that grew there this summer. The long stalk of my black beauty zucchini, a four-foot long green boa constrictor with leafy appendages some reaching two feet across, displays dozens of stump scars where I severed the pulpy fruits from the plant's hearty rope of vine. I still harvest from it, a small anemic club here and there, but it's glory days are over. Like the tomatoes, the peppers, the green beans, the potatoes, everything is slowing down and pulling back towards the earth.

Shall We Dance? Why You Should Vote 'YES' for the ZAP Tax

Written by Amy Brunvand

Don't forget to vote on Tuesday, November 4! It's particularly important because mid-term elections—the kind without any presidential candidates and all the attendant hoopla—tend to favor more radically partisan candidates. Essentially, the fanatics all turn out to vote, and the moderate voters all stay home. Some great candidates this year are running for local, state and federal offices. They really need you to vote for them. Also on this year's ballot: Vote to renew ZAP funding.

Winter in the Henhouse

Written by Katherine Pioli

Colorful, joyful, plucky little hens. The human-chicken relationship is an ancient coexistence, thought to have begun nearly 10,000 years ago. Across cultures and through the eons, chickens have been symbols of virility, mothering and fertility (as well as the national symbol of France). Roman armies used them as tellers of fortune: A hungry chicken assured victory.

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